What does your software NOT do?

Oh, the joys of upgrading computers. For every opportunity to improve efficiency there is a corresponding incompatibility that requires sorting out. A new machine probably also means a new version of the operating system, which subsequently means a new version of most of the software you use. Without this the IT industry would probably not exist.

Another problem is that, when evaluating new software, the marketing material and web sites often tell you what a system can do but not what it can’t. One option is to download a trial version and test it, but this only increases dissatisfaction when you find it does 99% of what you want but not the vital 1% you need. Then you have to start checking out the uninstall instructions, if there are any.

So, while it’s nice to see fancy graphics, screenshots and videos, it’s important that software companies balance the fluffy, exciting feel of using a new system with essential details of its capabilities and practical operation. While I dislike getting underneath the bonnet of my car, I need to know that occasionally I have to fill it up with a specific type of fuel.

Get it right and, if the software is as good as the developer says, more people should buy it because they will be more confident about what it can do for them.