Don’t be pushy

#SillySeasonPR #12

Don't be pushy! #SillySeasonPR

Don’t be pushy

“Come and interview us and we will give you an exclusive story.”

“This is our story and this is the angle.”

“I sent you a press release, but haven’t seen it in your newspaper.”

I’ve heard these a few times lately.

They don’t get you off to a very good start. I jump at the chance of an interesting interview or a good story and I’ve got a good nose for news and can usually tell (but not always).

Give yourself the best chance

Many press releases don’t get published.

This can be because they are:

  • irrelevant to the publication
  • inaccurate
  • an advert disguised as news
  • so poorly written that no one understands it
  • sent too late to meet the deadline
  • just not interesting

There are many reasons why they don’t get published, but don’t let being pushy be one of them.

How can I get my press release considered for publication?

  • Make it relevant – research the publication and tailor it accordingly
  • Check all the facts so that everything you say is correct
  • Don’t sell – tell a real story. Adverts aren’t news
  • Make sure it is well written. Let colleagues or friends read it to check they understand it
  • Send it in good time, especially if timing is essential, eg to publicise an event
  • Make sure it is interesting. Just because you are excited, doesn’t mean other people will be
  • Make yourself useful to journalists – help them do their jobs

If your press release is all of these things, it has a better chance of being considered for publication, but there is still no guarantee.

The editor could suddenly decide to reduce the number of pages in an issue so articles planned for inclusion will have to be left out.

Late news often arrives. A company making a lot of people redundant could take precedence over other news as could a company announcing a lot of new jobs.

However much we plan, we can’t tell what other news is going to come up.

Work with journalists

Journalists aren’t happy when they’ve been working on articles and their space is cut, so you won’t make them any happier by badgering them about including your press release.

The more helpful you are and the better the news you provide, the more likely a journalist will include it or try to give you coverage.

Being pushy will not help.

Your #SillySeasonPR #12 task is to review your press release to make it relevant, interesting and suitable for the publications you are targeting. Good luck and do ask any questions you have.

Tomorrow: ? Visit to find out

Use the content and tips in our videos and posts below to boost your business.

 

Where is everyone?

#SillySeasonPR #8

Where is everyone? #SillySeasonPR

Where is everyone?

Over the past week, I have been asking for comment from businesses for articles that I am writing. I sent emails, but the autoresponders bounced back: “I am currently on annual leave.” I wondered how I would get any comment if there was no one about.

This a good reminder of why we called this the #SillySeasonPR challenge.

So many people are on holiday, but there is still space to fill in publications.

I would rather write about real news that people are interested in reading rather than silly ones just to fill space.

Take the opportunity

Now is your opportunity to take advantage of the ‘silly season’ when many businesses close down their PR machinery as they go on holiday. In early September, there will probably a flood of press releases as they try to catch up.

Take advantage of this lull.

Oh, and I did eventually get the comments I wanted. Those businesses will get the benefit of coverage in a newspaper.

Your #SillySeason PR task #8 is to get cracking on your press releases before the end of the silly season. Good luck and do ask any questions you have.

Tomorrow: ? Visit to find out

Use the content and tips in our videos and posts below to boost your business.

 

Is that adjective redundant?

This is a great blog. I know that because I wrote it myself.

What?

All right, it’s a blog, but who says it’s great?

That’s the trouble with adjectives. You can slip them into text here and there and they sound fine until someone else reads them.

As a newspaper writer, I cut adjectives. Press releases tell me that a development is ‘exciting’ or a product is ‘unique’. When I read these words, I look for proof. Too often it is not there. I cut the adjectives.

At one time I used such words myself until I realised that few things are truly ‘great’ and that it’s unlikely that someone really ‘loves’ cake. Perhaps we’d better not go there.

Of course, we are often excited by our own work, but we are biased. Will everyone think the same? Perhaps customers are excited and will be happy to be quoted in a press release, although it could still be a minority opinion.

If you have facts to prove that an event attracted the ‘biggest’ audience recorded or that a product has won an award as the ‘best’ of its type, then do make the most of these achievements. Superlatives can be powerful when they are accurate.

So I know this is not the ‘greatest’ blog you’ve ever read and I won’t pretend it is.

 

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